Topping-out ceremony for new Provender Mill at Bakers Quay

The topping out ceremony for Provender Mill in the Bakers Quay development will take place at 12.30pm on Friday 23 February. The right honourable MP for Gloucester, Richard Graham, will be cutting the ribbon to celebrate this significant milestone in Gloucester’s regeneration.

Less than a year since the foundations were laid in June 2017, an important milestone has been reached with completion of the roof and cladding of Developers Rokeby Merchant’s first new residential building. Rokeby Merchant have retained the style of the original iconic 19th century mill, providing affordable luxury via 47 new residential apartments as well as ground floor restaurants.

The area had fallen into disuse in recent decades. However with the continued regeneration of Gloucester Docks, especially at the adjacent Gloucester Quays development, there was added impetus to complete the final piece in the development jigsaw in the Gloucester Docks phase.

The apartments are being marketed by Naylor Powell and boast attractive vistas of Gloucester Docks, the Gloucester Sharpness Canal and the 15th Century Llanthony Secunda Priory from the spacious balconies. The first phase of this £60 million project is being built by Barnwood Construction.

Rokeby Merchant director Michael Chicken said: “I am delighted that the first phase of this Bakers Quay development has reached such an important stage. It is 5 years since I was introduced to Adrian who was had already been working on the project for 5 years and who has steadfastly steered this project through a myriad of issues (ranging from the Provender fire to a complex financial structuring) and I am confident will continue to do so until the whole Bakers Quay development is complete. His tenacious workstyle should be an example to all.

He added: “The development is one that Gloucester will be truly proud of. Provender itself provides 47 affordable luxury apartments, most with balconies. Provender features a stunning reception that will echo the history of the original Provender Mill, whilst its modern external walls will change colour from golden yellow to red as the light hits from different angles. A true focal point for Gloucester and Gloucester Docks.”

Adrian Goodall of Rokeby Developments, said: “We want to bring canalside living at its best to Gloucester and I hope we will achieve this. It is always difficult selling a dream from a derelict site, however now Provender has emerged onto the skyline, I hope people can now share this vision we have and appreciate how unique this building will be within the Docks.”

paul-james

Cllr Paul James – Leader Gloucester City Council

Councillor Paul James, Leader of Gloucester Council said: “It’s great to see work at Bakers Quay progressing so well after so many years of it standing derelict.  In particular, I think the new Provender apartment building is stunning.  I’m delighted that the iconic elevator shaft feature over the canal towpath has been incorporated into the new development and the metal cladding sets it apart from other buildings too.  It’s a great example of a contemporary interpretation of a heritage building.  Given the recent history of this site, it really is a phoenix rising from the ashes.  This development is taking place because of a partnership between the public and private sectors and I am grateful to Rokeby Merchant for staying the course, despite the challenges they have faced.  With all the regeneration taking place around it, this is going to be a great place to live.”

The Foster Brothers Oil and Cake Mill was established on the banks of the Gloucester Sharpness Canal in 1862. The company was amalgamated into British Oil and Cake Mills in 1899 but was still managed by the Foster family until 1945. When production moved to Avonmouth in the early 1950s, the mill was closed and sold onto West Midlands Farmers (WMF) as a distribution depot. WMF moved out of Bakers Quay in the mid 1990s and it was from here that the building fell into a state of disrepair and dereliction. In 2013, Rokeby Developments and Merchant Place joined forces to acquire and develop then site. Despite the extensive fire damage to the building in October 2015, the developers submitted plans that retained its iconic shape and silhouette.

 

The project is due for completion in July 2018.

 

There are opportunities for the press to enjoy the stunning views from the spacious balconies at the topping-out ceremony at 12.30pm on Friday 23 February. If you would like to attend, please contact  Natasha Roumian on 01452 207020 or email natasha@marketinggloucester.co.uk.

 

ENDS.

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Gloucester Folk Trail line up for free live music weekend

Organisers of the inaugural Gloucester Folk Trail have released their much-anticipated line up for a weekend of free live music in the city. Gloucester pubs, bars and cafes will play host to the county’s finest folk musicians from Friday 23 to Sunday 25 February.  The venues will throng with gig-goers as more than forty live performances take place across the city ranging from traditional folk acts and Morris dancers to thoroughly modern folk rock.

The Gloucester Folk Trail is one of the first events to be delivered by the Gloucester Business Improvement District with the aim of supporting the city’s night time economy.

Just some of the highlights amongst the stellar line up are:

Harpers Ferry


This thoroughly modern folk-rock band from Gloucestershire have graced the stages at the Phoenix Festival, Wychwood and Birmingham Jazz and Blues Festival. The band’s sound with a mix of folk, rock and country, has earned rave reviews from BBC Radio Gloucestershire’s Johnny Coppin, the Gloucestershire Echo and SoGlos.

The Jigantics


A super group featuring top Gloucestershire Bluesmen Rick Edwards and Mark Cole from Sons of the Delta, along with another favourite of the Gloucester Rhythm and Blues Festival, Keith Thompson. They are joined in this folk-roots project by vocalist and ukulele star, Sarah Kelly, and drummer, Martin Fitzgibbon.

Gruig


A rip-roaring, foot stomping band are infamous in the pubs and beer festivals Gloucestershire for their sing-along traditional Irish songs and fast-paced jigs and reels to get you up on the dance floor.

Way Out West

The wonderfully eccentric Way Out West bring their folk non-sensibilities to world of pop. On accordions, fiddle, guitar, banjo and ukulele, the hilarious three-piece help us discover the country roots of the Pet Shop Boys, the folk origins of the Spice Girls and The Smiths and what the Pussycat Dolls sounded like when Julie Andrews was still in the line-up.

Life O’Reilly


Life O’Reilly grew out of the live Irish music sessions held in and around Gloucestershire. Their mixture of guitar, fiddle, bodhran, tin whistles and stunning vocals recreate the much-loved feel of Irish folk music and their live performances show off their love and passion for the songs and tunes of the Irish tradition.

Natasha Roumian, of Marketing Gloucester who are organising the event on behalf of Gloucester BID, said: “Building on the successful model of the Gloucester Rhythm and Blues Festival, we are really excited to bring the Folk Trail to Gloucester. Although this is the first one, we are treating the Folk Trail as a test, and if successful, it will become a welcome addition to the Gloucester events calendar.”

Nick Brookes, Chair of the Gloucester BID, said: “Gloucester BID has been set up to support all of its business members across all sectors including those in the evening economy. The inaugural Gloucester Folk Trail is the first of many events that the BID will be supporting which we believe will drive footfall, improve the profile of the city and bring real benefits to the BID’s business members.”

Concertgoers are also invited to the Gloucester Folk Trail Preview Night on Thursday 22 February with a gig at TANK and an Open Mic event at The Old Bell.

For more information visit https://www.glosucesterfolktrail.com or search for ‘Gloucester Folk Trail 2018’ on Facebook.

For more information contact Ben Hau at ben@marketinggloucester.co.uk

 

 

ENDS.

 

Invitation to tender for Big Screen in Gloucester

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Gloucester BID Team

Gloucester Business Improvement District (Gloucester BID) are inviting expressions of interest for a rotating 15sqm digital screen to be installed in Kings Square Gloucester.

The screen shall rotate from vertical to horizontal and pivot on its base.

Please provide an estimate for manufacture, full installation, including groundwork and power connection and maintenance for the screen and supply of appropriate software to drive content

Any responses will be evaluated against the following criteria:

  • Expertise to design, develop and offer ongoing support to any solution provided.
  • Established trading record
  • Number of large format LED installations in the last 12 months
  • Ability to demonstarte UK based service and maintenance team
  • Demonstrate ability to service and maintain LED tiles

All expressions of interest or further queries must be addressed through email to hannah@gloucesterbid.org.uk

Closing date for expressions of interest 16th February

2018 Centre for Cities report describes Gloucester’s strengths and opportunities for growth

Below is a link to the Centre for Cities 2018 report which includes information on Gloucester.

Caveat

The report uses very sound metrics but it is nevertheless important to note that the geographic area relates to just the area covered by the local authority (LAU1) – in this case Gloucester city council.  This means that  the report’s conclusion on jobs, skills and so-on would not for example include data on businesses at Twigworth, Gloucester Business park, Staverton and so-on which for the purpose of this report are excluded.

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/18-01-12-Final-Full-Cities-Outlook-2018.pdf

Highlights include Gloucester:

  • Schools performing in top quartile nationally
  • Ranked 4th of 63 cities for having highest employment rates (structurally full employment)
  • 2% of city exports to China and growing
  • High level of services exports
  • Good levels of growth in high value jobs c.f. many cities (but still middle ranked)

 

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With the proposed Super City suggested in the #Glos2050 Big Conversation, we have asked Andrew Carter CEO of Centre for Cities would run an exercise using current benchmarks to see how these figures would be affected if the model was working today.  Marketing Gloucester will be assisting in providing data.  Currently Centre for Cities do not include Cheltenham as it falls below the threshold (135,000 users per day).

For further information contact info@marketinggloucester.co.uk

Full line up, times and locations announced for inaugural Gloucester Folk Trail #GetFolked now extended 22nd-25th Feb.

4bd270b3118c49b055e6151599b5635c-rimg-w720-h515-gmirolk musicians from around the county will congregate in Gloucester in a month’s time for a brand new, FREE event. The very first Gloucester Folk Trail takes place from 23 to 25 February as venues across the city host traditional and contemporary folk acts for a weekend of free live performances.

The bumper line-up of musical acts will be performing in the city’s pubs, bars, cafes and other venues. The Gloucester Folk Trail is the one of the first events to be funded by the Gloucester Business Improvement District (BID). Supported by Marketing Gloucester and venues who are also members of the BID, it is hoped that the Gloucester Folk Trail follows in the footsteps of the successful and long-running Gloucester Rhythm and Blues Festival.

Participating venues are listed below with more to be added:

  • The Abbey
  • Angie’s Bar
  • Café Rene
  • The Cavern
  • Cookes Coffee and Curios
  • The Cross Keys
  • The Dick Whittington
  • The Northend Vaults
  • The Old Bell
  • Peppers Café
  • The Tall Ship
  • TANK
  • Veranda Lounge

Danny Hammond from Match Factory Studios is the music liaison for the Gloucester Folk Trail, said: “It’s really exciting to see something different, supporting grassroots music from the wider county. The Folk Trail will embrace traditional and contemporary bands of the genre, appealing to a diverse audience. The atmosphere in the city is going to be excellent.”

Fred Fisher, joint owner of Angie’s Bar, said: “We’re really happy for Angie’s Bar to be involved in the Gloucester Folk Trail in it’s very first year. It’s great that Gloucester BID is investing in events and supporting its members to help drive footfall into the city centre.”

Gloucester BID will be supporting events like the Gloucester Folk Trail that benefit businesses in the BID area over the next five years, by drawing together members to work in partnership with each other to generate high footfall. It is hoped that music fans from around the county will descend upon Gloucester for what promises to be fun and vibrant weekend.

Don’t miss this great weekend supporting Gloucester’s live music scene and the county’s musicians. Thursday 15th to Sunday 18th February 2018

THURSDAY
Folky Thursday
Open Mic Old Bell/Tigers Eye
8pm onwards

Petty Hegglers Band 
The Tank
7pm onwards

FRIDAY

Sam Haward – Solo fingerstyle guitar
Cooke’s Cafe
5.15pm

Gwilym Davies – Songs of Glos. (Lecture)
Cooke’s Cafe
6pm

Danny Hammond – Solo fingerstyle guitar
Cooke’s Cafe
7pm

Mischief Afoot – Trad band
Cooke’s Cafe
8.15pm

Karen Swan – Acoustic songs
Pepper’s Cafe
6pm

Discovery – Acoustic Folk Duo
Pepper’s Cafe
7pm

ReBil – Acoustic Folk Duo
Pepper’s Cafe
8pm

Shepherd’s Crook – Vocal Folk Choir
Cafe Rene
7pm

Ruben Lovett – Folk Rock
Cafe Rene
9pm

Bewelien – Folk Rock
Cafe Rene
10pm

Lila J – Acoustic band
Veranda Lounge
8.15

Shaggy Dog Raconteurs
Dick Whittington
9pm

SATURDAY

Wolfren Riverstick
Angie’s Bar
3pm

Clint Mann
Angie’s Bar
4pm

Michael Parker
Angie’s Bar
5pm

Michael Parker
The Fountain
7pm

Lassington Oak – Morris Dancers
Fountain
2pm

Jam Session
Fountain
4pm

Michael Parker
Fountain
7pm

Bally Brogues
Fountain
8pm

Life O’Reilly
Fountain
9pm

Danny Hammond – Solo fingerstyle guitar
Cooke’s Cafe
5pm

Midsummer Grove – Acoustic Duo
Cooke’s Cafe
6pm

Meg Hayden – Acoustic songs
Saturday
7pm

Ragtime Jug Orchestra
Cafe Rene
9pm

Way Out West
Cross Keys
8pm

Beaver and the Foghorns
Dick Whittington
9pm

Life O’Reilly
Cavern
6pm

Sid Harvey
Cavern
7pm

Blind River Scare
Cavern
8pm

SUNDAY

ReBil
Cooke’s Cafe
1.30pm

Blind River Scare
Cooke’s Cafe
2.30pm

Karen Swan
Northend Vaults
Sunday 2pm

Lucy Jarrett
Tank
7pm

Midsummer Grove – Acoustic Duo
The Fountain
3pm

Danny Hammond – Solo fingerstyle guitar
The Fountain
4pm

Elgar Folk Ensemble
The Fountain
7pm

Gruig
The Fountain
8pm

That Shallot
Cafe Rene
3pm

Jigantics
Cross Keys
7pm

Funded by Gloucester BID and supported by Marketing Gloucester.

 

ENDS.

 

 

For more information contact ben@marketinggloucester.co.uk.

 

Notes for Editors

 

About Gloucester BID

Gloucester Business Improvement District is made up of 576 businesses in the city centre of Gloucester who voted in July 2017 to invest approximately £2.5 million back into the city.

 

 

 

 

Ben Hau
Head of Marketing

Marketing Gloucester Ltd
27 St Aldate Street, Gloucester, GL1 1RP
Tel: 01452 207020

www.marketinggloucester.co.uk

www.thecityofgloucester.co.uk

 

www.facebook.com/gloucester

www.twitter.com/visitgloucester

www.instagram.comvisitgloucester

 

To get YOUR event promoted for FREE go to

www.thecityofgloucester.co.uk/whats-on/tell-us-about-your-event

 

 

Registered in England 06589269 27 St Aldate Street, Gloucester, GL1 1RP

 

The contents of this message may contain views and/or opinions related to this Company’s business which are not necessarily the views of the company, and for which the company undertake no responsibility. The contents of this e-mail do not give rise to any binding legal obligation upon the company unless subsequently confirmed on headed business notepaper sent by fax, letter or as an e-mail attachment.

 

 

 

 

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Gloucester is trying to get a Purple Flag. What will it mean for the city?

Reinvigorated over the past three years by the ATCM, there are now 70 Purple Flag towns and cities and the positive response both by place managers, local businesses and venues, and the public is testament to the difference that this great initiative can make.

Coming Soon: Purple Flag For Colleges & Universities

59d6df5b-atcm-purpleflag-bannerHow Does It Work?

By meeting or surpassing the standards of excellence in managing the evening and night time economy (ENTE), Place Managers throughout the UK and Ireland – and now being taken up internationally – are enjoying the benefits of Purple Flag status.

Those already accredited have reported positive feedback from local businesses, a clear message for improved communications and a platform from which to promote their night time economy.

The accreditation process takes towns and cities through a comprehensive set of standards, management processes and good practice examples all designed to help transform the ENTE and provide a research, training and development programme.

Why should you apply for Purple Flag?

Our research indicates that Purple Flag can bring real benefits which include:

  • A raised profile and an improved public image for the location
  • A wider patronage, increased expenditure
  • Lower crime and anti-social behaviour
  • A more successful mixed use economy in the longer term

As the governing body, ATCM has set out the core agenda at the heart of Purple Flag which represents the standards that must be achieved and maintained for a accreditation, which in turn will lead to a successful evening economy. These five core standards are outlined here.

  • The Policy Envelope: An after-hours policy that shows a clear strategy based on sound research, integrated public policy and a successful multi-sector partnership.
  • Wellbeing: Successful destinations are all safe and welcoming with all sectors playing their part in delivering high standards of customer care.
  • Movement: Getting home safely after an evening out is crucial, as is the ability to move around the centre on foot with ease.
  • Appeal: Successful destinations offer a vibrant choice of leisure and entertainment for a diversity of ages, groups, lifestyles and cultures.
  • Place: Successful areas are alive during the day, as well as in the evening. They contain a blend of overlapping activities that encourage people to mingle and enjoy the place. They reinforce the character and identity of the area as well as flair and imagination in urban design for the night.

If you believe your city or town has safe and vibrant night time economy, then you are encouraged to apply for Purple Flag accreditation. Local authorities, town centre partnerships, business improvement districts, crime and disorder reduction partnerships, Pubwatch partnerships, civic societies and others can all take part. In our experience it is the Local Authority or Police who take the lead in most cases.

59d6df5b-atcm-purpleflag-banner

Jack Russell returns to Gloucester for WSP Art in the City 2018

 

Former England and Gloucestershire cricketer turned artist, Jack Russell MBE, will be one of the star attractions at this year’s WSP Art in the City on Saturday 14 and Sunday 15 July. Jack will be painting at the event and showcasing his work in Gloucester city centre. Jack is no stranger to Gloucester, having played cricket for the county at Archdeacon Meadow.

WSP Art in the City celebrates creativity inspired by Gloucester’s history and heritage, its picturesque surroundings and its people. The event features a live, outdoor painting competition (Saturday), along with free workshops and an art trail throughout the city centre (Saturday and Sunday). A total of £4,000 has been offered up as prize money across the different age groups in two competitions:

Plein Air – Live outdoor painting on Saturday 14 July.

Open Art – An open contest for artwork completed in the last year based on a theme.

Artists dotted around the city centre will be competing to best capture the spirit of Gloucester and its community, in an attempt to impress the judging panel which includes P.J. Crook, Richard Parker Crook, Stroud-based Swarez and Gloucester’s very own Russell Haines.

“It’s great to be involved with Art in the City.  It takes me back thirty years to my first artistic involvement with Gloucester when I drew a large picture of the Cathedral stone by stone! Also to my playing days with the County at Archdeacon Meadow, which I’ve had the pleasure to paint. I’m delighted to be having an exhibition in Gloucester during the festival which will be part of the art trail and I’m looking forward to seeing all the artists who are taking part. It’s a wonderful opportunity for people to come and express themselves, see other artists’ work and basically have a lot of fun. Even if you’ve never painted before come and have a go. It should be a magical adventure!”  Jack Russell MBE

Artistic director of the festival, Russell Haines, said: “This year’s WSP Art in the City will see Gloucester turned into one huge art space with exhibitions, competitions and workshops for everyone. It’s fantastic to have Jack Russell participating this year at the centre of our art trail. There will be exhibitions large and small from a diverse range of artists in our historic buildings, cafes and shops for everyone to enjoy.”

To register your interest in participating in Art in the City, email Artinthecityglos@hotmail.com or visit www.artinthecity.org.uk

ENDS.

 

 

For more information or interviews with Jack Russell and Russell Haines please contact Ben Hau at ben@marketinggloucester.co.uk.

 

 

 

Notes for Editors

 

Images

A range of images are available to download at

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/hffdl60nvbyhj08/AADkY0MTIqYaQlwqqp1G9LYka?dl=0

Please credit ‘Marketing Gloucester’.

10 Benefits Gloucester BID is Bringing to the City

SoMAC Art in the City banners

It’s been less than six months since 87% of businesses overwhelmingly voted to establish the Gloucester BID (Gloucester Business Improvement District). It is already showing successes, reducing instances of low level crime and helping increase footfall during the busy Christmas shopping period. The BID is also supporting the Best Bar None Awards and the Purple Flag scheme; recognising and rewarding bars, pubs and clubs who are committed to a safe and vibrant evening economy.

But there’s still more to come. Gloucester BID is committed to delivering a number of projects that will directly benefit its members within the BID area. Businesses will be able to network with each other through an upcoming series of events and receive professional training opportunities.

BID members will also be able to take advantage of money-saving initiatives, reducing a range of business costs. By joining together, members will also have a more powerful voice to ensure that their needs are better communicated.

Gloucester BID is investing in events and festivals to help drive more visitors to the city giving businesses the opportunity to capitalise on the increased number of potential customers throughout the year. This all bodes well with news of continued new arrivals of shops, bars and restaurants in the city; demonstrating that the confidence in the city is justified.

10 Benefits Gloucester BID is Bringing to the City

  1. City Protection Officers (CPOs)
  2. £300,000 over 5 years for promoting the city to increase footfall
  3. £600,000 committed for events and festivals to drive footfall
  4. Networking events in partnership with Gloucester Chamber of Commerce along with high quality networking and training opportunities for BID members
  5. Improvements to street scene, signage, public realm and street cleanliness
  6. £400,000 committed for aesthetics/look and feel of Gloucester
  7. Supporting late night economy, Purple Flag status and Best Bar None Awards
  8. Saving money for BID members via business cost reduction for utilities, recycling, business rates and insurance
  9. Powerful lobby for businesses in the area
  10. Provide assistance to the City Council, police, charities and other public to help tackle issues such as an anti-social behaviour, homelessness and begging.

Sandra Powell, owner of The Candle Tree on College Street, said: “I’ve had nothing but positive feedback on the BID and have been most impressed with the CPO’s who are very responsive. I’ve had to e-mail them before with some concerns and they were incredibly quick in responding with the help I needed. They are doing a marvellous job!”

Nick Brookes, chairman of Gloucester BID and a business owner, said: “It’s great that the BID was voted in favour of by Gloucester’s business community and with such a strong mandate. I am particularly encouraged by the positive effect that the City Protection Officers have had on the high street. I am looking forward to more positive changes the BID will make to improve the image of Gloucester to increase footfall, attract tourists and benefit the local community.”

Jason Smith, chief executive of Marketing Gloucester, said: “Gloucester has been a remarkable success story but we’re only part way through the journey. There’s no doubt that the significant investment by the Gloucester BID will have a material impact in supporting the economic health of the city, the financial viability of its businesses, and making Gloucester an even better place to live, work, invest, study and visit.”

TENDER FOR ALTERATION AND NEW WORKS TO FIRST FLOOR EASTGATE CENTRE GLOUCESTER

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Marketing Gloucester
on behalf of
UK Digital Retail Innovation Centre (UK:DRIC) 20.12.2017

TENDER FOR ALTERATION AND NEW WORKS TO FIRST FLOOR EASTGATE CENTRE GLOUCESTER

We are inviting interested contractors to apply for inclusion on the tender list for these works. Application does not guarantee inclusion on the list.
The works involves removals of walls and works to ceiling and floor finishes to the vacant retail and food hall and the creation of eleven small shop units, an open area and creation of back room offices.
A brief schedule of the works to be undertaken include: demolition of brick wall and erection of stud partitions, overhaul and repairs to existing suspended ceilings, new floor finishes and general redecoration. Open front to the units will be secured by open grid roller shutters. Alteration and adaption of existing sprinkler system, the electrical and mechanical systems and provision of new as necessary,
Estimated value of these works is £200,000.00 (two hundred thousand pounds) plus VAT where applicable.

Anticipated programme of project is shown in  appendix 1 available at this link>  click here
Application to be included for consideration by not later than 9th January 2018.
Invitation to tender 15th January 2018
Tender submission. 31st January 2018
Commencement of works 12th February 2018
Completion of the works 15th June 2018

Contractors interested in being considered for inclusion on the tender list should submit their details by not later than 5.00pm on 9th January 2018.
Company details should provide evidence of being conversant with this type of work including a list of projects undertaken with values, copies of last three years accounts, size of workforce including details of management team, work force numbers and breakdown into direct and self-employed and areas of work normally sublet.

Application should be made to:

Mr Jason I J Smith, CEO, Marketing Gloucester, 27 St Aldate Street, Gloucester, GL1 1RP to arrive not later than 5.00pm January 2018

For further information on UK:DRIC click here

Gloucester receives part of £500,000 funding to bring in USA tourists

Anglo – American ‘Connections’ project receives funding to bolster Special Relationship

Gloucester and twelve destination partners have bid successfully for a £500,000 grant from VisitEngland in a collaborative project to develop a range of experiences directed at the US tourism market. ‘Connections’ will produce a series of new, immersive, bookable English-themed visitor experiences specifically for the American market, encouraging visitors to explore England beyond London. The experiences will aim to tap in to the fascination of the many connections between England and America – a shared history, language, culture and ancestry. In an effort to inspire many visitors to discover their roots and the authenticity of local English culture.

Connections is one of a number of successful projects to receive funding from the UK Government’s £40 million Discover England Fund. The Fund is administered by VisitEngland and involves a programme of activity to ensure that England stays competitive in the rapidly growing global tourism industry, by offering world-class English tourism products to the right customers at the right timeThe Fund is a central government funded programme of activity, supported by match funding by partners in the public and private sectors.

VisitEngland Chief Executive, Sally Balcombe, said:

“The calibre of submissions to the Discover England Fund reflects the innovation in product development thriving across the country’s tourism landscape. The successful projects will boost international and domestic visitor growth creating a step-change in the industry and spreading the economic benefits of tourism across England.  Our research shows that many US visitors come to Britain due to historic family connections and these ancestry themed itineraries will inspire them to explore more of regional England.

A large-scale collaboration between 13 destinations, Connections will develop tourism products in the lead up to 2020, the 400th anniversary of the Mayflower’s historic voyage from Plymouth to the New World. Gloucester along with Bristol, Cambridge, Cornwall, Essex, Hampshire, Hertfordshire, Kent, Lincolnshire, Nottinghamshire, Plymouth, Torbay and Worcestershire  will look into themes with significant appeal to US visitors, such as Magna Carta and the rule of law, The writer of the American National Anthem, George Whitfield, The Mayflower, Virginia and early American colonisation, WW2, US military and the ‘special relationship’.

The project also aims to showcase the best of England’s culture and heritage through the development of a broad range of specialist guided tours and behind the scenes experiences and will be sold in the US via tour operators and travel agents. There were 2.9 million overseas visits to the UK from January to July this year from North America alone, an increase of 21% on the same period last year.

Jason Smith, CEO of marketing Gloucester said:

“This funding will have a huge impact on tourism for the city of Gloucester from the USA market, and will help build on the phenomenal growth the city has shown over the last five years.  We are delighted to be among the select few destinations that will be receiving the benefits of this significant funding“

GloucesterAMERICAN CONNECTIONS WITH GLOUCESTER

BUTTON GWINNETT 1735-1777

Born in Gloucester and educated at the King’s School. He became an American political leader, who as a representative of Georgia to Congress, was the second of the signatories (first signature on the left) on the United States Declaration of Independence. He was also the provisional president of Georgia in 1777, and Gwinnett County (now a major suburb of Atlanta) was named after him.

Gwinnett was killed in a duel by Lachlan McIntosh following a dispute over a failed invasion of East Florida.

His father’s tomb at Down Hatherley has been restored recently but there is probably some interpretation to do.  I have asked Stephen if we can put a plaque on 10 College Green, where he would have lived as a child (as well as Down Hatherley) and we probably should do something at St Nicholas as his father was vicar there as well.

CAPTAIN HOWARD BLACKBURN

Captain Blackburn arrived in Gloucester docks in August 1899 after sailing his 30ft cutter “Great Eastern” single handed across the Atlantic from Gloucester Massachusetts. He had spent 61 days at sea and had been affected by a badly swollen leg which prevented him from raising sail for 8 days. This journey was even more remarkable as he had lost all his fingers, both thumbs and a toe through frost bite during a severe winter storm on an earlier fishing voyage.

Blackburn was welcomed at the quayside by a large crowd of sightseers. During his stay in the city he was entertained by a number of leading citizens. Several hundred people visited the docks to see his tiny craft and many were welcomed aboard and were offered bourbon whisky and ship’s biscuits.

GEORGE WHITEFIELD

Whitefield was born in 1714 at the Bell Inn in Southgate Street. He was educated at King’s School, the Crypt Grammar School and later at Pembroke College, Oxford in1732. It was at Oxford that he met John and Charles Wesley and joined their Christian Society or “Holy Club” who were referred to as “Methodists”.

Whitefield was ordained as deacon in 1736 and as a priest in1739 and preached his first sermon in St Mary de Crypt church. The pulpit he used, together with its sounding board can still be seen in the nave. He first sailed to America early in 1738, the first of 7 such trips, returning later the same year. Shortly afterwards he crossed the Atlantic again where he preached to large audiences from Pennsylvania in the north to Georgia in the south. The impact of Whitefield on both English and American society was immense and his greatest asset was his magnificent voice. Benjamin Franklin calculated that he could be heard by 30,000 people at any one time.

The charity school he founded in Pennsylvania was the forerunner of the present University and he was also involved in the creation of the college at Princeton, New Jersey. No fewer than 51 American schools and colleges owe their inception to him. During his sixth visit to the colonies the Library at Harvard University was totally destroyed by fire and Whitefield secured a large gift of books from England to re-equip a new building. He died on Sunday 30 September 1777 at Newburyport, Massachusetts having preached no fewer than 18,000 sermons to an estimated 10 million people in his lifetime.

JOHN STAFFORD SMITH

John Stafford Smith was baptised in Gloucester Cathedral on 30th of March 1750. He was educated at the cathedral school where he became an accomplished boy-singer. By the 1770’s he had gained a reputation as an excellent composer and organist in London. This led to his election as a member of the very select Anachreontic Society that boasted amongst its membership Dr Johnson, James Boswell, Sir Joshua Reynolds, Henry Purcell and J.C. Bach. Smith composed the music for the society’s constitutional song entitled “To Anachreon in Heaven”. This song became popular in America following the establishment of several Anachreontic societies there.

During the second year of the war of 1812 the British fleet made a night attack on Fort McHenry on the eastern seaboard of the United States. A local attorney, Francis Scott Key, had boarded a British warship to secure the release of an American prisoner. Key was held on board the ship so that he could not pass on any prior intelligence of the attack. He watched the bombardment throughout the night and was pleasantly surprised to see a huge American stars and stripes flag still flying above the fort as dawn broke. He immediately penned a four verse poem to the tune composed by John Stafford Smith that began “Oh! Say, can you see, by the dawn’s early light….”

The poem was printed on handbills the next morning and distributed throughout Baltimore. The song became immediately popular and three months later it was played during the Battle of New Orleans. “The Star Spangled Banner” was officially adopted as the national anthem of the USA in March 1931.

MALCOLM COTTON BROWN

Born in 1897, he came from Chicago and trained as a pilot at Camp Benbrook, Fort Worth, Texas. He was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Royal Flying Corps in January 1918 and joined the largely American 90 Squadron in June and was promoted to full Lieutenant in the newly formed RAF. The squadron was transferred to Brockworth on the 15th of July to await delivery of their Sopwith Dolphin single seat fighters. A week later only one aircraft arrived and the pilots drew lots to see who would be the first to fly it. Brown held the winning ticket and immediately took off to put the plane through its paces. He put the aircraft into a series of screaming dives pulling out at about 100 feet above the ground. Halfway through a dive the port wing folded up and the plane went into a corkscrew spiral into the ground. Malcolm Cotton Brown was killed instantly. A tree was planted in his memory at Brockworth and there is a large memorial plaque to him in St Mary de Lode church containing the words “A son of America fallen for England”.

INCREASE MATHER

An American Puritan who graduated from Harvard in 1656 and was later described as the “most distinguished American of his generation”. He became an assistant to James Forbes the Presbyterian minister in Gloucester. Mather preached at St Mary de Lode church in the morning and at the cathedral in the afternoon.  Although he was delighted with Gloucester and resolved to devote his life to its spiritual needs, he left the city in 1660. Mather refused to conform to the reformed Church of England and returned to America in June 1661.

He travelled to England again in 1688 in an attempt to restore the Charter for Massachusetts which had been lost in 1684. Mather became the sixth president of Harvard College from 1692 till 1701.

Mather was involved in denouncing the tests for witchcraft used during the famous Salem Witchcraft Trials.

GLOUCESTER MADE BELLS IN AMERICA

The oldest peal of bells in the USA are in Old North Church, Boston. They were made in 1744 by the famous Rudhall foundry in Gloucester and installed in 1745.

One of the first bell ringers at the church was Paul Revere who with William Dawes made the historic ride to warn the rebel militia that “The British are coming”. This was a prelude to the first battles of the American Revolution. The church tower was used to warn of the approach of the British forces. One light for an advance by land, two lights for one by sea.

The Rudhall foundry was on the site of the present Post Office in King’s Square. There is a plaque to the right of the entrance.

AMERICANS IN GLOUCESTER IN WWII

The following anecdote was related by an American visitor during a guided tour of Gloucester. His father had been a Provost Marshall with the North American forces on their arrival in England.

“Two Provost Marshalls visited Gloucester prison to assess the suitability of the accommodation for the detention for any law breaking military personnel. They requested to be locked up in one of the cells that evening and not to be released until 7.00am the following morning. The prison staff duly obliged, but were shocked to find that the two marshalls had escaped sometime during the night”.

 

 

 

 

ENDS.

Press enquiries: For more information, please contact Ben Hau on 01452 207020 or email ben@marketinggloucester.co.uk.

Notes for Editors

Connections Destination Partners

Destination Plymouth Ltd.

Destination Bristol Ltd.

English Riviera BID Company Ltd.

Essex County Council

Hampshire County Council

Lincolnshire County Council

Marketing Gloucester Ltd.

Visit Cambridge and Beyond

Visit Cornwall CIC.

Visit Hertfordshire Ltd.

Visit Kent Ltd.

Visit Nottinghamshire

Visit Worcestershire Ltd.

 

About the Discover England Fund

  • In November 2015, the Government announced a £40 million Discover England Fund; an unprecedented opportunity for English tourism. The Fund aims to deliver world-class bookable tourism products joined up across geographies and/or themes; including integrated transport solutions to provide an end-to-end customer experience.
  • The Fund supports the growth of one of England’s most successful export industries, inbound tourism. Tourism is an industry that delivers jobs and economic growth across the English regions – contributing some £106bn each year to the economy and supporting 2.6 million jobs.
  • The Fund supported a number of pilot projects in year one (2016/17) that tested product development approaches. In years two and three, 2017-19, the fund will support:
    • A number of large-scale collaborative projects to be delivered over the two year period 2017-2019 that will create a step-change in bookable English tourism product for international consumers,
    • A smaller funding pot for new one year pilot projects (in year two), and
    • Continuation funding for existing year one projects that demonstrated early learnings (in year two).

 

About VisitBritain/VisitEngland

  • VisitBritain/VisitEngland is the national tourism agency – a non-departmental public body funded by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS)
  • Working with a wide range of partners in both the UK and overseas, our mission is to grow the volume and value of inbound tourism across the nations and regions of Britain and to develop world-class English tourism product to support our growth aspirations. For further information and to access the latest in-depth market intelligence and statistics visit visitbritain.org or www.visitbritain.com and www.visitengland.com for consumer information.

 

About Marketing Gloucester

  • Promotes the City as a great place to live, work, study, visit and invest; locally, nationally and internationally.
  • Organises award-winning events and festivals, delivering to the city and region hundreds of thousands of visitors and millions of pounds of GVA*.
  • Engages with businesses and investors.
  • Implements programmes to develop pride of place amongst residents.
  • Partners with Gloucester City Council, gFirst LEP, Cotswolds Tourism and Gloucestershire County Council.

Marketing Gloucester is a public private partnership.